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Difference between revisions of "Composition"

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A binary [[Algebraic operation|algebraic operation]]. For example, the composition (or superposition) of two functions <img align="absmiddle" border="0" src="https://www.encyclopediaofmath.org/legacyimages/c/c024/c024290/c0242901.png" /> and <img align="absmiddle" border="0" src="https://www.encyclopediaofmath.org/legacyimages/c/c024/c024290/c0242902.png" /> is the function <img align="absmiddle" border="0" src="https://www.encyclopediaofmath.org/legacyimages/c/c024/c024290/c0242903.png" />, <img align="absmiddle" border="0" src="https://www.encyclopediaofmath.org/legacyimages/c/c024/c024290/c0242904.png" />. See [[Convolution of functions|Convolution of functions]] concerning composition in probability theory.
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A binary [[Algebraic operation|algebraic operation]]. For example, the composition (or superposition) of two functions $f$ and $g$ is the function $h=f\circ g$, $h(x)=f(g(x))$. See [[Convolution of functions|Convolution of functions]] concerning composition in probability theory.

Revision as of 06:47, 1 February 2013


A binary algebraic operation. For example, the composition (or superposition) of two functions $f$ and $g$ is the function $h=f\circ g$, $h(x)=f(g(x))$. See Convolution of functions concerning composition in probability theory.

How to Cite This Entry:
Composition. Encyclopedia of Mathematics. URL: http://www.encyclopediaofmath.org/index.php?title=Composition&oldid=29374